Things don’t always go as planned.

 When events don’t happen as we think they should, it doesn’t always mean something went wrong. We plan events with our human brains, and we do the best we can.

The story of Naaman amplifies this principle. Naaman had leprosy, and went to Elisha to be healed. Elisha told him to wash himself seven times in the Jordan River, and he would be completely healed. That sounds like a good deal to me. Back in those days, leprosy was a terminal illness; it was never healed. Any door to healing would be a good door.

Instead of being grateful for the advice, Naaman grew angry. “I though Elisha would come pray for me, wave his hand over me, and cure me.” Naaman was looking for a more personal touch.

Naaman continued, “Aren’t there rivers in my hometown? He could have told me to wash in one of those rivers to be cured. Why does he make me go to the Jordan River, a river in Israel?”

Naaman was the commander of the Syrian army, and Elisha was telling him to wash in the Jordan–the water of his enemy!

Naaman’s servants convinced him to follow the instructions. “Why don’t you wash yourself as Elisha said, and be cured?”

Do you want to be healed, or complain because you have to step foot in the enemy’s territory? Not only go there, but immerse yourself seven times, where people can see you. Humbling, isn’t it?

Finally Naaman gave in, and dipped himself seven times in the Jordan. He was completely cured; his flesh became firm, and healthy like that of a child. He wasn’t merely cured, his youth was restored.

God’s Word reminds us that His thoughts are higher than our thoughts. Sometimes the answer that comes is not the one that we expected. We pray and expect events to happen a certain way, and when they don’t, we get upset. If we have truly cast the care of the situation on God, He will answer us in His time, and in His way.

And it will be the correct solution.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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