The Profound Simplicity of a “Thank You”

Whatever happened to sending a Thank You Note after receiving a gift?

When you go to a Wedding and shell out $150, is it really so terrible to expect a handwritten card with a postage stamp to show up at your mailbox within the next three months?

It’s gotten to the point with the younger generation, that I don’t expect a card. If I get one, I’m thrilled…and surprised. I guess if I get a misspelled text message such as “thnk u” I should be happy and move on with my life.

Common Courtesy is and Endangered Species. I see this when we drive; Road Rage is the new normal.

We recently attended a Wedding of a cousin’s son, and within 3 weeks, received a handwritten, personalized thank you card.  I was thrilled and surprised. Back in the day this would have been a no-brainer; someone gives you a gift, you say thank you.

I remember being 7 years old, and my mother sitting me down and showing me how to write a thank you note. It would go something like this: “Thank you for the _____. I really like it. I’m glad you were able to come to my party. Thank you again. ” Signed, my name.

Maybe this could be taught in school as a Basic Life Skills class, along with How to Fill Out a Job Application, How to Dress for a Job Interview (i.e. pull your pants up and cover your belly, and maybe remove a few body piercing rings….)

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2 thoughts on “The Profound Simplicity of a “Thank You”

  1. I agree with you about the thank you notes. I think a text is fine to say: Happy Birthday, Happy Mother’s day, stuff like that, but not a thank you for a gift or act of kindness. Some things just need a personal touch. I believe you are right about the younger gerneration. They are not being taught a lot of courtesies that our generation took for granted. No yes sir, no ma’ams, no please and thanks yous, table manners, religion. I could go on. I think teaching a class in Life Skills is a great idea but with all the funding cuts to schools, it’s unlikely. I liked your article.
    deb

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